Join the CIBRN Leaders for a webinar on Tuesday, Nov 26, 8:00 pm ET

Please join the CIBRN Leaders for Webinar 3 of 2019 on Tuesday, Nov 26 at 8:00 pm ET.

The webinar will review the recent discussions and polls in the CIBRN community:

  • CIBRN 2019 Q5: Biosimilars have been available in Canada for several years and yet are not being prescribed or used to same degree as they are in other countries. Inflectra and Remsima are used at a rate of 5-10% in Canada after being available for four years, while countries like Norway and the United Kingdom have respective use rates of 98% and 90%. What factors can explain these discrepancies? Should Canada be doing more to increase the use of biosimilars? [View 3 replies to date]
  • CIBRN 2019 Q6: As of Jun 1 2019, the CADTH Common Drug Review and the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review (pCODR) will generally no longer review biosimilar drug submissions. CADTH states that the change reflects the way it deals with “traditional” small molecule generic drug products, which are also not typically subject to review. Do you agree with this change? [View 3 replies to date]

 

  • CIBRN Poll #1: As a busy clinician, where do you obtain your best information on biologic medications? [View]
  • CIBRN Poll #2: With the expanding number of options available for treating specific conditions, is there merit in limiting choice by using a stratified or step approach to selection? [View]
  • CIBRN Poll #3: The introduction and promotion of biosimilar medications is fueled by a need to lower the overall cost of healthcare delivery. Where do you think we should be looking for cost savings? [View]
  • CIBRN Poll #4: Biosimilars have been available and used in other jurisdictions around the world. How long after a biosimilar has been introduced and used by patients in a real-world setting would you feel comfortable with its potential efficacy and safety? [View]
  • CIBRN Poll #5: Do you agree with the 2019 Update of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Recommendations on the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) that says: “In adults with stable AS receiving an originator TNFi, we strongly recommend continuing treatment with the originator TNFi over mandated switching to its biosimilar.”[View]
  • CIBRN Poll #6: Which of these issues in the Canadian drug access and pricing landscape is of greatest concern to you as a clinician? [View]

To connect to the webinar:

Step 1: Join the teleconference at 1-866-830-9434 and enter participate code 7994216

Step 2: To access the web portion click on this link and enter as a guest:  https://studio7communications.adobeconnect.com/cibrn_nov26_2019/

CIBRN Poll #6: Which of these issues in the Canadian drug access and pricing landscape is of greatest concern to you as a clinician?

If you haven’t yet participated, we invite you to share your views in the following poll. Click here to answer.

CIBRN Poll #6: Which of these issues in the Canadian drug access and pricing landscape is of greatest concern to you as a clinician?

Seismic changes are happening or being considered in the Canadian drug access and pricing landscape. Issues include recurring drug shortages, possible implementation of a national pharmacare program, American importation of Canadian drugs, and changes to PMPRB legislation designed to reduce Canadian prices for new drugs entering the market.

Which of these issues is of greatest concern to you as a clinician?

  • Drug shortages of established products, many now genericized and often made by only 1 or a few manufacturers, due to manufacturing issues.
  • The cost to indebted governments of establishing a national pharmacare program.
  • Delays in the launch of innovative drugs due to lower Canadian market prices under the new PMPRB rules.
  • Drug shortages in Canada due to Americans importing drugs from Canada to take advantage of lower Canadian prices.

Click here to answer

CIBRN Poll #5: Do you agree with the 2019 Update of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Recommendations on the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) that says: “In adults with stable AS receiving an originator TNFi, we strongly recommend continuing treatment with the originator TNFi over mandated switching to its biosimilar.”

If you haven’t yet participated, we invite you to share your views in the following poll. Click here to answer.

CIBRN Poll #5: Do you agree with the 2019 Update of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Recommendations on the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) that says: “In adults with stable AS receiving an originator TNFi, we strongly recommend continuing treatment with the originator TNFi over mandated switching to its biosimilar.”

RATIONALE: While the efficacy of originator and biosimilar TNFi is comparable, and although either could be chosen to initiate new courses of TNFi treatment, it was the opinion of the panel to recommend against mandated switching to a biosimilar during the course of treatment, in the absence of evidence of interchangeability. Medication changes can increase the risk of destabilizing a patient’s condition, and the panel judged that additional data were needed to understand the frequency of potential problems and concerns associated with switching patients who were stable on an originator TNFi to its biosimilar. Given these concerns, the panel judged that there should be a compelling rationale for switching medications, particularly in light of the marginal cost savings apparent for US patients.

Full text of update available here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/acr.24025

Do you agree with the ACR’s recommendation on the treatment of AS?

  • I agree because of the limited evidence on biosimilar switching in AS.
  • I agree because of the limited evidence on biosimilar switching in general in rheumatic, dermatologic and GI conditions.
  • I agree because of the limited cost savings anticipated from biosimilar switching in the North American context.
  • I disagree with this recommendation.

Click here to answer

CIBRN Poll #4: Biosimilars have been available and used in other jurisdictions around the world. How long after a biosimilar has been introduced and used by patients in a real-world setting would you feel comfortable with its potential efficacy and safety?

If you haven’t yet participated in the poll, we invite you to share your views. Click here to answer.

Biosimilars have been available and used in other jurisdictions around the world. How long after a biosimilar has been introduced and used by patients in a real-world setting would you feel comfortable with its potential efficacy and safety?

  • Right away
  • A few months
  • 1 year
  • 2 years
  • 3 years
  • 5 years
  • Never

Click here to answer

CIBRN Poll #3: The introduction and promotion of biosimilar medications is fueled by a need to lower the overall cost of healthcare delivery. Where do you think we should be looking for cost savings?

If you haven’t yet participated in the poll, we invite you to share your views. Click here to answer.

The introduction and promotion of biosimilar medications is fueled by a need to lower the overall cost of healthcare delivery. Where do you think we should be looking for cost savings? Select one or more.

  • Hospitals
  • Physicians
  • Prescription Drugs
  • Long-term Care
  • Community Care
  • Other

Click here to answer

CIBRN Poll #2: With the expanding number of options available for treating specific conditions, is there merit in limiting choice by using a stratified or step approach to selection?

If you haven’t yet participated in the poll, we invite you to share your views:

With the expanding number of options available for treating specific conditions, is there merit in limiting choice by using a stratified or step approach to selection?

  • Yes, stratification should be used with the more costly biologic therapies.
  • Yes, stratification should be used for all classical and biologic therapies.
  • No, physicians and patients should be free to select any biologic therapy after failing traditional classical therapies.
  • No, physicians and patients should be free to select any classical or biologic therapy in any order once systemic therapy is indicated.

Click here to answer